Tag: wealth management

The Future of the Wealth Management Industry: The S-curve Shift and the Modernization Opportunity | Blog

The wealth management industry has evolved over the years, transitioning from reputation-driven models to technology-led advisory services. Read on to uncover how wealth management firms can develop a digital blueprint to navigate the next digital frontier and better serve their clients in an increasingly hybrid and personalized landscape. Get in touch to discuss further.

In our earlier blog, How Technology Can Help the Wealth Management Industry Navigate Coming Changes in 2023, we discussed how digital disruptions will impact the wealth management industry and the role technology and service providers can play in helping wealth management firms navigate the choppy waters ahead. Continuing with our two-part blog series in the wealth management space, this blog will touch upon how this industry has transitioned through the different eras and how we are now on the cusp of a new digital future. The current question is, what will the digital blueprint be to help wealth management firms be better prepared for this new normal?

Wealth management eras – is the industry undergoing another S-curve shift?

The wealth management industry has witnessed several s-curve shifts in the past and has evolved from being a reputation-driven business to a technology-led advisory model. We are now witnessing the next inflection point, moving from persona- to person-based personalization through the hybrid trust model. The initial journey of the wealth management industry was about family-based offices and reputation-driven businesses. It was all about having the right intimacy with the client, nurturing the exclusivity, and delivering that strong advisory model. It was driven by large systems of records, but experience remained bespoke and in-person.

After this era, the wave of customer expansion hit with the emergence of mass affluent customers. It became less about serving HNIs and UHNIs and more about capturing the mass affluent segment that demanded access to similar asset classes and WM strategies as HNWI and institutional investors, which led to the rise of robo-advisory models to democratize access to these services. Enterprises wanted to serve this new segment better in a cost-effective model that could help them meet their margin targets as well. This led to rapid technological disruption in the wealth management industry and pushed us into the digital advisory model that we are currently in. We saw this in the case of UBS in late 2022 with the launch of WE.UBS, a digital wealth platform for mass affluent clients in China in partnership with technology provider Tencent.

Currently, we can see that enterprises are focusing on developing a hybrid trust model. In this model, they utilize emerging technologies such as AI to transform end-to-end customer journeys and give their clients access to new products such as digital assets, ESG-linked investments, and overall financial wellness services. This could be seen in action a couple of years ago when HSBC introduced HSBC Prism Advisory in Asia, blending face-to-face and digital interactions in private banking. This service leverages BlackRock’s Aladdin Wealth™ technology, combining data analytics with HSBC advisors’ expertise.

Another notable example is when Citi announced its plan last year to utilize AI as a tool to simplify and automate procedures, enabling private bankers to dedicate more time to client service.

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However, the top-of-mind questions are “Are we nearing the end of this era?” and “Is there a new world order coming for the wealth management industry?” This space has already seen a rapid expansion of products to cater to different customer segments, but now enterprises need to provide assistance to customers in navigating the buying experience while creating trust in a model that is now both human and digital. The wealth management industry has multiple siloed channels where the human-assisted channel enables great advice, but as soon as it moves to digital channels, the level of experience starts getting non-uniform and disjointed. Customers often talk about a lack of contextualization as they interact on such channels.

Psychographic segmentation – can it fix what is broken?

Hyperpersonalization has become one of the key focus areas as wealth management firms are trying to drive competitive differentiation in the current macroeconomic landscape. The emerging client segment, comprising of millennials and Gen Z investors, expects tailored services as per their preferences and values seamless experiences across both digital and human advisory channels. In light of these demands, we see the approach towards hyper-personalization shifting from demographic-based to a more psychographic-based segmentation.

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Enterprises are now moving away from utilizing broader aspects such as age, gender, occupation, and location to create different personas and are utilizing individual personality traits such as lifestyle, attitudes, beliefs, interests, and values to create unique experiences for clients. This strategy promises to be especially effective in captivating and retaining young investors, a highly desirable client demographic poised to emerge as a lucrative segment amid the intergenerational transfer of wealth spanning diverse geographic regions. To embark on this journey, HSBC recently partnered with a European consulting firm, Zühlke, to revamp its mobile wealth management services for UK clients. Zühlke’s experts conducted a study on the investment preferences of British customers, providing insights that enabled HSBC to tailor its services to better meet their needs.

To excel in this approach, enterprises must possess the necessary technology to seamlessly monitor, acquire, and leverage customer data in real time, empowering them to dynamically create personalized experiences with agility and scalability. They need to establish trust with their customers so that they feel comfortable in sharing this private personality traits-related data, which can eventually lead to personalization-led value creation and drive customer delight. In late 2023, Morgan Stanley announced plans to roll out a gen AI bot for its HNWI clients that will provide functionalities such as summarizing a meeting, drafting a follow-up email for suggested next steps, updating the bank’s sales database, scheduling a follow-up appointment, and acquiring knowledge to aid advisers in managing clients’ finances, covering aspects like taxes, retirement savings, and inheritances.

Future of wealth – can the roots of a modular core system power the tree of wealth?

As enterprises embark on this experience innovation journey, it is important for them to have the underlying technology stack to support the industrialized delivery of these data-driven experiences at scale. Currently, they are facing challenges in establishing digital workflows as most of them still have the legacy architecture consisting of Excel spreadsheets and siloed data systems, which makes streamlined data management and analysis difficult.

They are increasingly looking at leveraging cloud-based data management systems that can help them optimize their IT infrastructure costs and improve their ability to process structured and unstructured customer data in real time and at scale. We also saw that a few months ago, Northern Trust collaborated with Finbourne Technology, a UK-based data solutions provider, to adopt its cloud-native data management solution. This partnership aims to modernize Northern Trust’s technology by offering cost-effective and scalable data calculation and processing, enabling near real-time delivery of valuations and other crucial data to clients.

Integrating the cloud into their business and technology operations will also help them roll out new features quickly and keep up with the constantly changing customer demands. In this process of driving data and intelligence in their operations, one of the key focus areas for enterprises is prioritizing and sequencing this migration of workloads to the cloud across the various elements in the wealth management value chain. They want to identify the quick wins that would have the maximum impact while having lesser complexity associated with the transition.

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The wealth tree, as seen in the graphic, is what we believe the future of wealth would look like. The fruits and leaves represent wealth for end customers by creating customer delight through innovative products and personalized experiences. This was seen in action in early 2024 when Kinecta Federal Credit Union announced a strategic partnership with cloud-based wealth management solutions provider FusionIQ to enhance its digital investing services by leveraging the platform’s features, such as digital advice, self-directed investing, and other financial well-being solutions. Also, in 2023, J.P. Morgan partnered with TIFIN to launch TIFIN.AI, aiming to accelerate AI-powered fintech innovation in wealth management. This initiative includes using AI for client portfolio insights for advisors, alternative investing, workplace wealth management, and insurance, among other applications.

In this world of personalized experiences, customers want to feel trusted and safe with wealth enterprises as they enable these multi-channel experiences. They want customers to be able to invest in alternative assets and grow their wealth as wealth management enterprises orchestrate all of it.

As enterprises think about this, they want to be compliant and provide a secure and protected environment. There is a need to have a core system that is modular, composable, and automated. There needs to be a lot more API enablement, which can be continuously optimized in terms of the infrastructure and the applications that are running on top of it. To industrialize the data-driven personalization engine, the core system needs to enable it in a trusted, safe, and secured manner so the security aspect becomes paramount. The two big enablers to this journey will be running operations and having data on the cloud.

In the journey to build out this wealth tree, all ecosystem players, from wealth managers and technology providers to service providers, will have a role to play and a different journey to traverse.

We would be interested to hear about your journey in this evolution. Please feel free to reach out to Ronak Doshi, [email protected], Kriti Gupta, [email protected], or Pooja Mantri, [email protected] to discuss further.

Watch the webinar, Transforming to Thrive: Building Winning Operating Models Amid Disruption Across Industries, to learn how enterprises should think about disruptive changes as they go about their transformation agenda.

Digital Experience Platforms (DXP) in Asset and Wealth Management (AWM) Products PEAK Matrix® Assessment 2023

Digital Experience Platforms (DXP) in Asset and Wealth Management (AWM) Products PEAK Matrix® Assessment

The Asset and Wealth Management (AWM) industry is seeing the democratization of finance, growing demand for personalized digital experiences, and the emergence of new products such as digital assets and ESG-compliant investments. To adapt to evolving customer preferences and meet regulatory requirements, AWM managers are increasingly turning to Digital Experience Platforms (DXPs) to revamp their operations, streamline costs, enhance data management capabilities, and deliver tailored client experiences. By leveraging DXPs, AWM firms aim to provide advisors with a comprehensive, real-time view of data through intuitive dashboards, enabling them to deliver better service.

The integration of DXPs empowers asset and wealth managers to optimize their processes, personalize client interactions, and create an enhanced advisor experience. DXP providers are plugging the gaps in functionality coverage through build, buy, and partnership investments, along with the infusion of emerging technologies in their current product offerings. They are also establishing a robust partnership ecosystem comprising FinTech point solutions, technology providers, WealthTechs, and consulting and implementation partners to drive commercial and GTM innovations.

PEAK DXP AWM

What is in this PEAK Matrix® Report

In this report, we assess 12 leading DXP providers for AWM products and categorize them as Leaders, Major Contenders, and Aspirants. The research will help buyers select the right-fit technology providers for their needs, while technology providers will be able to benchmark themselves against the competition.

Contents:

  • Twelve DXP providers for AWM products
  • Key trends in the DXP market for AWM products
  • Key enterprise sourcing considerations (strengths and limitations) for each of the 12 DXP providers evaluated
  • Implications for DXP providers

Scope:

  • Industry: Asset and wealth management
  • Geography: global

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How Technology Can Help the Wealth Management Industry Navigate Coming Changes in 2023 | Blog

With the economy headed for slower growth, technology is more important than ever to enable companies to better serve customers by providing hyper-personalized experiences. Read on to learn how the disruptions will impact the wealth management industry and the role technology and service providers can play to help wealth managers navigate the choppy waters ahead.

In light of changing investor preferences, mounting regulatory pressures, and a looming economic slowdown, the wealth management industry is at the cusp of change. While the industry has demonstrated good resiliency and recovery post-pandemic, signs point to subdued growth in the next few years.

The wealth management industry has been experiencing one of the longest periods of market growth and economic stability in recent history. Financial support by governments, lower interest rates, and limited consumption opportunities have contributed to rising household wealth, generating increased revenues for wealth management companies from more fees and advisory support.

But the rapid rise in interest rates and fear of an economic slowdown will put pressure on this industry in 2023. Let’s look at the factors disrupting the wealth management industry in the first of our two-part series.

Fundamental change in ecosystem participants – passing trend or here to stay?

The industry is seeing structural changes in ecosystem participants. Traditional wealth managers are no longer the only players offering wealth management services and products. Challenger banks, pension providers, insurance firms, super-apps, nonbank financial companies (NBFCs), and nonbank financial institutions (NBFIs) are entering the market and creating competition.

These emerging segments already have access to a large customer base supplemented by data insights on demographics and buying patterns. This enables them to remove silos for customers and simultaneously improve income streams by reducing churn risk.

Customers now can access investment services within an umbrella of existing offerings. While this is a win-win for both parties, it is making wealth managers apprehensive as they realize the critical importance of retaining and more effectively serving their current customers.

Rethinking growth versus profitability conundrum – impact of a potential slowdown?

While the pre-pandemic era was all about expanding and tapping into new customer segments, the strategy for serving various customer bases has significantly shifted. With the changing market dynamics, the focus has morphed from expanding and tapping into newer segments to building trust with existing customer segments and enabling hyper-personalized experiences.

A potential economic slowdown would have ripple effects on the wealth management industry. The focus on rapid growth would take a backseat as enterprises pivot their attention to reducing costs and improving profitability. This would directly impact tracking advisor productivity, improving advisor-to-client ratios, and enabling hyper-personalized experiences.

At the same time, providing access to emerging themes like Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) and digital assets will prove to be differentiators in the long run. Regulatory activity is heating up in the ESG space and will lead to corresponding technology implications for wealth managers’ IT estate, as previously discussed in our blog, New Sustainability and ESG Investment Regulations will Spur a Second Digitalization Wave in Wealth Management.

Technology implications – will the IT estate need to be re-examined?

The wealth management technology estate traditionally has been characterized by multiple disparate systems siloed by products or functions, fracturing the customer experience. At its core, wealth management grapples with a massive data problem – how to effectively analyze customer data, understand their journeys, and identify better cross-sell/upsell opportunities.

Wealth managers need an IT estate that is flexible enough to accommodate these hyper-segments and different products, and their underlying data to address these evolving demands at speed and scale.

Identifying the right platform partner, enabling product expansion via ESG and digital asset offerings, and quickly disseminating this information to advisors will be key priorities for wealth managers as they assess their technology estates.

Identifying the ecosystem strategy for system integrators and other technology companies to improve fractured customer experiences will be equally important for technology providers. At the same time, service providers also will need to orchestrate and assemble best-of-breed solutions for wealth management clients by building a robust partnership ecosystem.

As wealth managers grapple with these market changes, technology has never been more important to help them better prepare and tackle the potential challenges coming their way.

The key questions that need to be answered include:

  • How can the service cost be reduced?
  • How can the right tools be used to improve advisor productivity?
  • How can a microservices-based Application Programming Interface (API)-enabled composable core be built?
  • How can data be leveraged to enable personalized client experiences?
  • How can a scalable and purpose-built cloud infrastructure be used to run mid- and back-office operations on the cloud?

We are interested in hearing how wealth managers are preparing and tackling these market dynamics, and how this is manifesting in the conversations technology and service providers are having with clients. Please reach out to [email protected] or [email protected] to share your thoughts. In our next blog, we will look at the future state of the wealth management industry and provide a technology architecture blueprint for this space.

Learn more about how to deliver better customer experiences in our LinkedIn Live session, Frictionless Customer Experiences: The Key to Unlocking Satisfaction.

New Sustainability and ESG Investment Regulations will Spur a Second Digitalization Wave in Wealth Management | Blog

The clock is ticking for asset managers to provide arduous and complex Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) data on financial funds mandated under the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID II) by January 2023. To meet European regulations, the wealth management industry will need to embrace advanced digital tools to account for investors’ ESG preferences – leading to a second digitalization wave. Read on to learn how this will impact technology providers.  

The global wealth management industry is at an inflection point. The strong growth in assets under management for wealth managers has been fueled in part by the digitization wave sweeping this industry.

Generational wealth transfer and the rise of the next breed of investors have redefined advisory services from a physical to a hybrid model. This step change in wealth management firms’ traditional customer base has led to increasing demand for tailored and digital customer experiences.

The first digitization wave resulted in firms increasingly collaborating with FinTechs, building in-house innovation capabilities, and adopting digital technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI) and analytics to develop new products, services, robo-advisors, and business models.

With the rise of sustainability and ESG preferences in investing, a second wave is coming  

As investors and advisors settled into the new normal and wealth management services became accessible to all, another demand pattern emerged. Next-generation investors are cautiously choosing the right wealth manager to help manage their wealth.

Today’s new client base is increasingly attracted to companies with strong sustainability and ESG standings and wants evidence from wealth managers of funds’ internal and external sustainability commitments.

However, the rise of greenwashing poses serious reputational risks for wealth managers. The lack of a single source of truth in analyzing ESG data means that no standard terminology exists to accurately classify any company’s ESG standing.

Investors are baffled by the sheer increase in ESG funds entering the market and are concerned about their authenticity. Millions of dollars in penalties have been levied on large financial services enterprises over greenwashing claims this year alone.

New MiFID II guidelines on ESG

To fight greenwashing, the European Union has passed MiFID regulations to promote sustainable finance products and facilitate greater transparency for all participants. Under this amendment, advisors will need to identify client ESG preferences and incorporate sustainable products in portfolios accordingly.

However, classifying ESG data for each fund across 580 mandatory, conditional, and optional fields is a mammoth task. The disparate data sources make it difficult for enterprises to accurately account for ESG scores. Another bigger emerging problem is how all this data will be used to connect to investors’ sustainability preferences.

Because of the data complexity and challenges facing asset managers to comply, the original deadline has been extended from August 2023 to January 2023.

What will this mean for wealth technology providers?

The industry already faces competition from emerging FinTechs who capture market share and provide contextualized experiences. On top of this, a significant gap exists between the new guidelines and the current state of investment platforms to meet these requirements.

Asset and wealth managers will need to assess whether their current platform can ensure compliance with this changing regulation and partner with technology providers to modernize their digital solutions.

This will be challenging as we believe the user interface in many wealth management technology platforms has not evolved at the same pace as the core functionality, which will hamper the industrialized delivery of personalized and contextualized experiences at scale across hyper-segments.

The new regulations will require adding an ESG layer to existing platforms to account for investors’ preferences. As sustainability and ESG preferences become ingrained and drive technological changes in current platforms, expect to see a second wave of digital advancements coming.

Wealth technology providers will have to accelerate their ESG roadmaps in the next 12-18 months and show value from these initiatives. We recommend providers take the following actions:

  • Craft roadmaps to ensure their technology platforms comply with the new regulation
  • Engage proactively with wealth management clients to help them navigate the nuances of the regulatory change
  • Invest in a partnership ecosystem for ESG data providers that can help enterprise clients solve the data gap

The compliance deadline extension has given wealth managers much-needed extra time to assess their technology offerings and develop roadmaps to incorporate ESG preferences. With the compliance date fast approaching, providers will need to move quickly to invest in their platforms to provide the digital solutions the wealth management industry needs to meet the MiFID II ESG amendments.

Has your organization made changes to meet the sustainability and ESG investment regulations? Please reach out to [email protected] to share your experiences and learnings.

Also, don’t miss our LinkedIn Live event, Sustainability and the CIO’s Office: A Powerful Connection, to learn how the diversity of people and power of technology can strengthen your sustainability strategy.

How Changing Demographics and the Pandemic are Influencing Wealth Management | Blog

Millennials and Gen Xers currently account for a majority of the earning population worldwide. As a result, the largest demographic cohort looking to manage wealth or create retirement income is shifting from baby boomers to these population segments (see the exhibit below), which are generally more involved, aware, and digitally oriented than preceding generations. The new investor generations demand information at their fingertips, anytime, anywhere – something impossible to achieve with traditional wealth management methods.

Exhibit: estimated shift in wealth from baby boomers to Gen X and millennials from 2016 to 2046

estimated shift in wealth from baby boomers to Gen X and millennials from 2016 to 2046

The impact of COVID-19 on wealth management

The COVID-19 outbreak has brought some key challenges in wealth management to the forefront. First, it has highlighted gaps in traditional wealth management methods, accentuating the pressing need for digital transformation. COVID-19-induced restrictions have severely impacted agent availability and as well as customers’ ability to visit advisers. Firms that can leverage digital tools to balance business continuity challenges with customer expectations will be able to differentiate themselves from others in the current climate.

Second, revenue erosion resulting from the COVID-caused recession, combined with an increase in business costs, may drive consolidation in the industry, as smaller firms will find it difficult to stay afloat. We are already seeing a shift in asset classes’ preferences. High Net Worth Individuals (HNWIs) and Ultra HNWIs (UHNWIs) will be impacted, as the wealth managers’ diverse portfolios are impacted. More than half of respondents to a UBS Group AG survey of wealthy investors said they feared not having enough liquidity in the event of another pandemic, and a similar percentage expressed worry about leaving sufficient money to their heirs.

What wealth managers need to do

Wealth managers need to increase their focus on services such as workforce management, operations continuity, customer communications, digital, goal-based planning, and portfolio impact advisory to persist through the current challenging situation. At the same time, they shouldn’t lose sight of the perpetual risks to business, such as cyberattacks, money laundering, and other security threats. Wealth management firms will need to ensure – even in the absence of physical interaction and with limited agents – that leadership maintains the confidence of both customers and employees.

Digital will remain the overarching theme to address these challenges. In recent times, Business-Process-as-a-Service (BPaaS) for back-office operations and robo-advisory have gained traction, though the solutions’ scale and magnitude continue to remain low. While BPaaS helps firms bolster their critical operations,  technology leverage can be increased further via more digital products, automated cybersecurity systems, smart portfolio creation, trade analytics, and trade simulations for efficiency improvements, productivity gains, bandwidth creation, and customer satisfaction in the next normal.

As wealth management firms look to achieve these objectives, they will require support to quickly and efficiently adopt digital, set up the required infrastructure, move workforce interactions to virtual mediums, revamp operations and traditional workflows to minimize human intervention, and hedge location-based risks. They will have to carefully prioritize tasks and implement digital step-by-step, so as not to abruptly overhaul traditional methods and processes. For this, they could opt for off-the-shelf products or customized solutions, or choose an external provider to do it all.

To tide themselves over the crisis and prepare for what’s to come, we recommend that wealth management firms:

  • Instill confidence in their clients and employees and shield themselves against other risks to survive this unprecedented situation. It will also be vital to take additional precautionary measures to maintain investor confidence. Given investor loyalty to certain firms, it would be useful to focus on maintaining the customer base rather than acquiring new customers
  • Align themselves with and adopt emerging digital industry trends, including robo-advisory, automated workflows to close sales, remote due diligence, and subscription-based advice models
  • Ease the pressure on their bottom lines by focusing on reducing cost-to-serve; automating their middle and back offices could serve as a starting point
  • Continually assess their investment philosophies; while COVID-19 is a crisis like no other, firms must draw lessons from previous crises to diversify their assets and maximize their investments in passive funds that make reasonable margins

At present, digital transformation is no longer a strategy to cater to a specific customer segment but the very means to survive. It will help meet customer experience standards and preferences in relationship management, query resolution, and communication. For employees, digital tools will enable more robust decision-making and goal-based planning for portfolios, as well as help monitor them real-time to enable faster turnarounds and higher returns.

Wealth Management: Market Trends You Need to Know | Blog

When you outsource your wealth management function to a third-party service provider, you’re not responsible for handling day-to-day operations and client contact. But you still have a huge responsibility in making sure your provider is fully capable of serving your clients’ needs.

Here are five major market trends that are affecting the wealth management industry. Is your provider addressing them?

Trend 1: End of bank secrecy

As the global crackdown on bank secrecy continues, wealth management advisory firms have no choice but to quickly move from secrecy-led tax services to a more holistic and comprehensive approach to investor portfolio management.

Trend 2: Evolving investor requirements

There’s a very different advisor-investor dynamic with millennials than with baby boomers. The younger investors, especially those of the entrepreneurial class, are looking for a much wider range of services from their wealth advisory partners. Beyond tax management and planning, millennial investors want:

  • Access
    • Seamless access to wealth and investment advice across platforms and channels
    • Greater access to investment ideas relating to environmental responsibilities and social impact causes
  • A networking support platform where they can exchange notes about financial management with fellow investors, colleagues, friends, and social media, instead of solely depending on regular report and data feeds from their advisors
  • Passion-based investments that are not only used as a diversification strategy but can also yield high risk-adjusted returns. Popular examples we are seeing include wine, art, watches, coins, and cars
  • DIY, wherein investors are provided with tools and advice to perform their own research
  • Highly tailored investment strategies, e.g., for female entrepreneurs
  • Real-time updates and faster turnaround times for almost all processes within the wealth management lifecycle
  • Access to the specialized set of offerings, unconventional risk management strategies, and alternative investments funds wealth managers typically offer to just Ultra High Net Worth Individuals (UHNWI.)

Trend 3: Robo-advisory platforms

Despite the robot versus human debate, robo-advisory platforms continue to gain prominence. And investors are increasingly embracing a hybrid approach where they can get low-cost advice from robo-advisors and leverage human advisor expertise when more nuanced investment decisions come into play.

Trend 4: The digital disconnect

A technology-enabled front-office certainly helps financial services firms achieve some of their efficiency and client service goals. But RPA in the back-office can make their operations even more efficient and effective, and analytics in the back-office can help them make faster, better investment decisions, and anticipate customer behavior with greater precision.
Evolving fee models

Facing diminishing returns, investors are increasingly demanding more transparency around the fees they are charged. In turn, the fee model is gradually moving from commission-based to performance-based. For example, some providers are charging their fees linked to how well they perform against a particular benchmark index or rate.

Trend 5: The compliance conundrum

Despite rising costs, enterprises continue to remain skeptical and cautious about outsourcing large chunks of the compliance function. They’re increasingly outsourcing some transactional activities, such a regulatory reporting and basic documentation vetting, to their third-party providers. But they’re still holding more critical services, such as due diligence, end-to-end KYC, and AML processes, close to their vests. And this guarded position makes very smart business sense. Because they are ultimately responsible for correct compliance, and because so much is at stake, enterprises should only consider outsourcing these types of processes if they have full confidence in their providers’ expertise and ability to effectively fulfill their compliance obligations.

What trends are you seeing in the market? Is your wealth management provider able to keep pace with your evolving requirements? How are they charging you for the services? Please share your thoughts with me at [email protected].

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