Tag: automation

Intelligent Workplaces: Enriching UX with Enterprise Chatbots — On-Demand | Webinar

Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | 9:30 a.m. EST

View On-Demand Recording

Research Practice Director Ashwin Venkatesan was a key speaker during Hexaware’s March 14 webinar: Intelligent Workplaces: Enriching User Experience with Enterprise Chatbots.

The enterprise chatbot landscape is undergoing a significant shift, driven by the transformation to the digital workplace. Enterprise interest in chatbots is accelerating as a result of the need to deliver on the twin mandates of user experience and productivity.

Attendees will get an overview of third-generation virtual assistants and see how to build a long-term roadmap for adoption of chatbots. Topics to be addressed include:

  • Exploring chatbot evolution and what the future holds
  • Busting prevailing myths around chatbot adoption
  • Best practices for enterprise chatbot adoption
  • Creating a roadmap for holistic chatbot functionalities
  • Real life examples of successful implementations

Speaker
Ashwin Venkatesan, Research Practice Director, Everest Group

Linkedin 2018 Workplace Learning Report is out and loud – Where are the developers? | In the News

The Linkedin 2018 Workplace Learning Report is out and takes the pulse of the current L&D trends.

The survey is based on the responses from 1,200 L&D or HR professionals, 400 people managers, 200 executives and 2,200 learners from North America, Europe, and Asia.

However, from a developer’s perspective, the results of the report seem… troubling. L&D and HR professionals, as well as people managers and executives, appear to pay a ton of attention on the development of soft skills of employees while the development of technical skills, as part of a company’s L&D program, seems of little significance. Let’s have a closer look at some of the results.

According to the survey, “talent developers are preparing their workforce for automation by naming ‘training for soft skills’ their #1 priority”; and it makes sense, right? You want your employees to be ready for the automation that DevOps brings as its core, therefore, you invest in the development of soft skills among your employees so that they have the knowledge to navigate the new age of company culture.

But what about the actual developers; the people behind the development of these automations? Why don’t they enjoy that generous of a share of a company’s resources for the development of their skills, the technical skills to be more precise?

When talking about DevOps, developers carry a huge part of the burden through the automation process and, as Yugal Joshi argued, “they’re not at all pleased with that and believe that they are being asked to address IT operations’ laggardness”.

Read more in JAXenter.com

With All The Talk of Transformation, Are RPA Projects Bad? | Sherpas in Blue Shirts

This past week, I had the opportunity to deliver a keynote speech at the Dallas RPA and Cognitive Summit that focused on the difference between digital projects (in this case, RPA projects) and transformations. In a nutshell, here are the key takeaways:

  • Your Why Matters: RPA implementation by itself is not a strategy but an enable of a specific objective(s) the organization is trying to accomplish
  • What you want to accomplish can be far reaching: The outcomes of your RPA effort have the potential to range from IT operations improvements, business efficiency, or improvements in the customer experience. The closer to the customer, the more transformative the effort is likely to be
  • How you choose to execute determines your impact: Since technology is rarely a barrier to success, the alignment of the business stakeholders, the cultural adjustments, and the approach to risk management will be the determining factors in the ability to scale and to capture the intended value

While my talk was purposefully focused on pushing the group’s thinking around transformation, the world in which most of the attendees current live is all about projects. The dichotomy between my focus and their reality led one of the attendees to ask whether projects were a bad thing and what they as mid-level manager could do to encourage transformation.

RPA projects are not bad

RPA projects are by no means bad or inferior to transformation efforts. In fact, most transformation efforts are implemented through a series of projects. However, it is important to know that projects implemented outside of the context of a transformation effort will have limited impact. It is perfectly acceptable to do standalone projects – just do not expect them to deliver results that will be significant enough for customers or the marketplace to notice.

On the other hand, understand that you cannot run a transformation as though it were a project and expect good results. Given the level of complexity and need for executive sponsorship, transformation run as projects usually do not scale well beyond the initial pilot, take excessively long to implement, and rarely achieve business impact. If it is a transformation, run it as such.

Use RPA projects to ready your organization for true transformation

Realistically, if your title is Director of RPA, Business Process Improvement, Operations Excellence, etc., the chances of you being able to initiate a digital transformation in your organization are slim. That is not to say, however, that you cannot have some influence on the organization through you work you do with your RPA projects.

RPA adoption is still relatively new and most business stakeholders are not familiar with the potential impact it can have, comfortable with the different type of risk it brings, nor aware of the level of effort required to use it for transformation. An approach that starts with a project focus that creates a pull in demand from the business side of the organization could be just the early experience an organization needs to begin to consider RPA and other automation technologies as a part of its digital transformation efforts company-wide.

View the full presentation.

RPA & AI Germany Forum — April 13 | Event

Research VP Sarah Burnett will be a keynote speaker at the 2018 RPA & AI Germany Forum in Berlin held on April 13. Sarah will lead a session titled RPA and AI: The Power of Two.

Summary: RPA and AI are very different types of technologies but when combined, they can help organizations get significantly more value out of automation. In this session, Sarah Burnett, lead automation analyst at Everest Group, will talk about:

  • The differences between the two types of technologies
  • The suitability of the two for automating different types of processes
  • Automation technology adoption trends – how enterprises are using RPA and AI for process automation
  • How to get started on each and combine the two for end-to-end automation

The session will help organizations look beyond tactical deployments to develop automation capabilities that deliver business outcomes.

When

April 13, 2018

Where

VKU-Forum, Invalidenstraße 91, 10115
Berlin

Speaker

Sarah Burnett, Research VP, Everest Group

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