Tag: talent shortage

IT Talent – Winning the Short-term Battle and the Long-term War | Blog

With the cost to secure IT talent internally and through third-party providers only continuing to rise, attracting and retaining technology workforce will require immediate and long-term tactics. Participate in our study to identify best-in-class IT workforce development strategies in leading global organizations.

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July Quick Poll | How Recruiting, Hiring, and Retaining IT Talent Changed in Q2 2021

The cost of hiring top-tier IT talent is escalating by the day. The persistent skills shortage has been exasperated by increasing post-COVID digital transformation spend and pent-up business demand, creating an intense short-term talent scramble.

Despite enterprises using known offensive (attraction) and defensive (retention) tricks, a demand-supply gap of 15%+ for critical roles in cloud, data, automation, agile, and security is being seen across regions. Offering compensation corrections and counters, bonuses, flexible location options, or job rotations are keeping companies in the race, but more ingenious measures are needed.

July Quick Poll | How Recruiting, Hiring, and Retaining IT Talent Changed in Q2 2021

Insights to win the short-term battle

Enterprises are realizing that classical attraction and retention strategies are being relegated to “common differentiators.” Many enterprises are starting to max out on the stretched end of their annual IT workforce budgets – even as attrition levels spike beyond 30 percent for key roles.

We see this scramble persisting over the next 3-6 months. However, as pointed out by our CEO Peter Bendor-Samuel recently, fulfillment of pent-up demand and potentially increased cross-border talent movement is expected to start narrowing the demand-supply gap from the current dizzying levels as we enter 2022.

IT Talent War

 

Here are a few novel approaches enterprises can take to alleviate workforce challenges to a certain extent, especially around access and time-to-hire:

  • Relax shortlisting criteria: Recalibrate technical competency thresholds (e.g., the stringency of HackerRack test ratings and additional technical rounds), within reasonable limits, to broaden the talent funnel in the short term. Consider increased training at the start and onboarding graduates with dedicated training investments
  • Involve business and operations: Follow the lead of best-in-class enterprises by having:
    • IT engineers, product managers, and agile coaches – actively recruit and scout in online communities
    • Senior IT and business leaders – elevate brand value and excite prospective candidates via informal discussions
    • IT teams – screen candidates to cut down shortlisting efforts, especially for critical/complex roles
    • Team members – approach candidates before the on-boarding to build rapport
  • Upskill rapidly: Stagger skilling and training for new employees joining the organization and existing employees switching roles to reduce deployment time (e.g., from 8-9 weeks to 4 weeks)
  • Focus on internal mobility: Re-evaluate internal career progression designs and create better growth opportunities for employees by properly mapping competencies, clearly articulating alternative roles/paths, and incentivizing critical skills development
  • Explore alternative channels: Expand staffing partnerships, leverage hackathons/online competitions, proactively reach out to developer communities (Hacker News, Github, Stack Overflow, and Reddit), and engage with boot camps to improve channel access
  • Hire location-neutral: Hire talent remotely with no requirement of the work location to tap into the broad IT pools and push decisions on Work from Home (WFH) or visas for later. Consider pods, satellites, and Centers of Excellence (CoEs) to access niche skills
  • Increase referral premiums: Jack up referral premiums by 50 to 100 percent, especially for critical positions
  • Award retention bonuses: Offer retention bonuses with a time lag of only a few months to counter immediate attrition

Staying ahead in the long-term talent race

With IT at the front and center of every business, enterprises across industries are inevitably competing for the same target talent pool. With demand expected to outstrip supply, only enterprises that take their tech workforce destinies into their own hands will survive. And the planning and structural interventions required to drive IT talent self-sufficiency need to begin today, if not already.

IT Workforce Strategy and Planning

If you are interested in learning how other organizations are addressing the IT talent shortage, Everest Group is currently conducting an extensive study to identify best-in-class, or Pinnacle, IT workforce development strategies in leading global organizations. Take the survey

We will share a complimentary summary analysis of the survey results highlighting how your organization compares against the peer group with respect to capabilities created and business outcomes achieved.

Please reach out to [email protected], [email protected], and [email protected] to discuss this critical topic.

Also watch Peter Bendor-Samuel’s two-part video series about the ongoing talent war.

Amid Global Talent Shortage, Everest Group Identifies Skilling Strategies that Drive 3X ROI for Talent-Focused Organizations | Press Release

Five Global Business Services (GBS) organizations are set apart by strategic skilling initiatives that significantly improve business outcomes, employee experience

Exacerbated by COVID-19, the war for talent is more intense than ever. According to Everest Group, the only way enterprises can build the necessary skill base to remain competitive is to realign employee skills with emerging business needs and provide employees with opportunities for personal growth. Easier said than done, but Everest Group has identified five best-in-class Global Business Services (GBS) organizations* that are leading the way.

In its newly published report, “Skilling Strategies for GBS Organizations—Pinnacle Model® Analysis 2021,” Everest Group examines 40 GBS organizations and of those identifies five Pinnacle GBS™  organizations—those best-in-class entities that are achieving superior outcomes because of their advanced skilling capabilities. These Pinnacle GBS organizations have generated three times more cost savings and return on investment (ROI) through their skilling initiatives compared to other GBS organizations.

Everest Group defines skilling efforts as post-onboarding interventions focused on improving employees’ skills and competencies to better deliver existing work and/or to deliver more complex or new work. The mode of intervention can range from self-learning to classroom-based training and beyond, including job rotation and cross-functional assignments.

Pinnacle GBS organizations have been able to achieve significant business impact by effectively driving their skilling initiatives, as differentiated by capabilities and characteristics such as the following:

  • A dedicated skilling team focused on GBS skilling.
  • Commitment and participation from the GBS organization and enterprise senior leadership.
  • Active collaboration with business units on all aspects of the skilling journey (such as funding, program design, skill gap assessment, and content creation and delivery).
  • Periodic assessments of the existing skill inventory and gaps against a standardized skill taxonomy. The study also reveals key skill gaps that GBS organizations are facing.
  • Incentives and career-developing motivators for employees, such as accelerated career paths and internal mobility.
  • Use of technology and ecosystem partners as accelerators for skilling programs and to improve employee experience.

Among those GBS organizations that track cost reduction impacts of skilling initiatives, the contrast among outcomes is significant:

  • ROI on skilling spend: 15-20% for Pinnacle GBS organizations compared to 3-5% for others
  • Reduction in operating costs: 13-18% for Pinnacle GBS organizations compared to 4-6% for others
  • Reduction in hiring costs: 9-13% for Pinnacle GBS organizations compared to 4-6% for others

“The firms we’ve identified as Pinnacle GBS organizations have created unique positions and developed scaled skilling programs to help the overall enterprise. They are developing their GBS organizations into global talent hubs,” said Sakshi Garg, vice president at Everest Group. “In the current Pinnacle Model analysis, we look at skilling strategies that GBS organizations have adopted and highlight those organizations that have achieved superior business outcomes. The journeys of these best-of-the-best companies provide insights into the key enablers needed to achieve desired outcomes and point to the investments required for the greatest speed to impact. Whether companies want to make incremental changes or achieve major transformations, Pinnacle GBS organizations exemplify the way to success.”

***Download a complimentary abstract of the report here.***

About Everest Group
Everest Group is a research firm focused on strategic IT, business services, engineering services, and sourcing. Our clients include leading global companies, service providers, and investors. Clients use our services to guide their journeys to achieve heightened operational and financial performance, accelerated value delivery, and high-impact business outcomes. Details and in-depth content are available at http://www.everestgrp.com

*Note: For the purposes of this report, Everest Group uses the term GBS to include Shared Services Centers (SSCs), Global In-house Centers (GICs) and Global Capability Centers (GCCs), although distinctions in these business models can be made.

How Long Will the Acute Talent Shortage Last? | Blog

Companies now face an acute talent shortage, particularly for digital skills. As I described in my recent blog, this talent shortage means companies must now pay a lot more for new talent and pay more for existing talent to keep them from leaving. Consequently, it will bust corporate budgets for 2021, and it is already causing a boom in offshoring. Company executives now ask me whether I believe this will turn out to be a short-term imbalance between supply and demand or if secular forces at play that will make the talent shortage a much longer-term issue.

Read more in my blog on Forbes

Acute Talent Shortage Set to Break Budgets | Blog

Companies that create annual budgets will find their 2021 budget busted because of the rapidly increasing rise in the price of talent – both for internal employees and for talent provided by third-party service providers. Even the wage situation six months ago is significantly different from now, as are the chances for hiring and retaining the necessary talent to meet business needs. What should your company expect, and how can you manage this situation?

Read more in my blog on Forbes

Potential War For IT Talent In 2021 | Blog

At Everest Group, we study a lot of forward-looking indicators, and we believe the service market prospects for next year are significant. In a recent blog, I talked about anticipating a robust market in the third-party services space in 2021. However, companies face a surplus of opportunities in the coming year at the same time as they face a scarcity of talent.

Read more in my blog on Forbes

Will COVID-19 Ease the Relentless War for Talent? | Blog

While some people in the global services industry think that large scale unemployment and the slowdown in growth due to the COVID-19 pandemic may reduce the talent demand-supply gap, we wholeheartedly disagree. Indeed, we believe that strategic workforce planning has become even more critical for the global services industry.

Here are four reasons why organizations need to accelerate their workforce initiatives right now.

Talent shortages will become acute

A survey we conducted in early 2020 found that, even before the COVID-19 crisis, 86 percent of enterprises considered the talent shortage a key barrier to achieving business outcomes. This situation will further exacerbate. It’s true that the impending economic downturn could lead to even more unemployment and oversupply in the talent market. However, the available skills profiles may not necessarily match organizations’ current and future requirements, especially because highly skilled talent is expected to be retained even during downsizing. Increasing focus on automation and digital transformation will further widen the demand-supply gap for skills, making it difficult for organizations to source suitable skills internally or in the open market. The prevailing circumstances (e.g., the lockdown, financial distress, and health issues) may impact overall talent employability in the open market, further compounding the talent availability issue.

Rapid digital transformation is inevitable, and it will intensify the demand-supply gap

COVID-19 has accelerated digital transformation across organizations. It has not only reinforced the utility of tech-enabled platforms and advanced automation for seamless service delivery during mandatory Work-From-Home (WFH) protocols, but also enabled organizations to react to the evolving business environment and customer needs faster. The impending budget cliff and business model changes will further push organizations to prioritize digital transformation, which will have implications on the talent needed both to drive this change and to deliver services after transformation. Demand for emerging skills will spike even faster, again creating the need for reskilling, alternative talent models, and productivity enhancement. We are already seeing a spike in hiring by companies like Amazon and Google. Some firms are seeing this as an opportune time to acqui-hire – or acquire startups primarily for their talent. Leading global banks, healthcare firms, and manufacturing firms are rethinking their talent strategies.

Supposedly foolproof location and BCP strategies did not work in the face of this pandemic

COVID-19 has exposed key issues with enterprises’ and service providers’ existing locations strategy and Business Continuity Planning (BCP) approaches. Nearly three-quarters of enterprises that have offshore/nearshore GBS centers operate in only one location. Even enterprises with multiple GBS centers have a high concentration of talent in their largest center. Others have developed centers of excellence with large portions of their workforce for a specific function consolidated in a few locations. Less than 10 percent of GBS centers were truly prepared for a seamless WFH model. Companies will need to re-evaluate their redundancy matrices and location/portfolio mixes to achieve a more robust BCP. Some seemingly obvious responses to locations portfolio questions may not apply anymore.

WFH is here-to-stay

A 2017-18 survey by the Bureau of Labor Statistics revealed that nearly 30 percent of the American workforce could work remotely. The extended lockdown in the near term and a high utilization, once the COVID-19 crisis has abated, will likely make WFH an integral component of the overall service delivery model. This change will have significant talent implications – motivation, employee engagement, performance metrics, reporting metrics, communication protocols, and collaboration – which organizations will need to proactively address to optimize productivity and enhance output.

COVID-19 has precipitated a fundamental shift in the way we work. There are underlying opportunities for enterprises and service providers that proactively adapt to the new normal. We believe there are four immediate steps that enterprises must take:

  • Review your enterprise global workforce strategy
  • Develop a roadmap for skills development initiatives
  • Review your locations portfolios and BCP strategy
  • Build a playbook for integrating WFH and crowdsourcing into your services delivery models

We’d love to hear your thoughts on how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting talent strategies. Please share with us at: [email protected], [email protected], or [email protected].

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