Tag: service provider

Nearly Half of All Sourcing Investments Leave Enterprises Unsatisfied | Press Release

But in performance rankings, TCS, Cognizant, HCL, Accenture and L&T Infotech are honored for creating best ‘overall experience’ for clients

Despite large-scale investments by service providers, 48 percent of enterprises surveyed by Everest Group are not satisfied with their service provider’s performance. In particular, service providers are performing poorly as “strategic partners” for enterprises and score an average rating of five on a scale of one to ten.

There are also significant gaps in enterprises’ expectations and service providers’ performance with respect to innovation, creative engagement models and day-to-day project management.

“Most service providers are perceived to be technically competent, but technical expertise and domain expertise are considered ‘table stakes’ by enterprises across industries,” said Chirajeet Sengupta, partner at Everest Group.  “Enterprises now expect their service providers to move beyond day-to-day delivery and focus on larger strategic business issues. Unfortunately, service providers still have a long way to go to meaningfully engage clients and become strategic partners, and that is a significant concern for the industry. This research signals the wake-up call and offers service providers guidance on how to strategize their engagement approach and prioritize investments to meet mounting customer expectations.”

In general, enterprises believe that mid- and small-sized service providers bring considerably more innovation and engagement flexibility than their larger counterparts. In fact, enterprises believe some large service providers have become lethargic and complacent and are indifferent to client requirements.

In contrast to these sentiments, five predominantly large service providers received the honor of creating the best “overall experience” for clients, based on client commentary and weighted aggregate ratings given by interviewed enterprises on key assessment dimensions.

  • Accenture: Accenture is perceived to bring market-leading domain expertise to solve complex problems and drive business outcomes.
  • Cognizant: Clients appreciate Cognizant’s approach to becoming their strategic partner as well as its flexibility in commercial constructs.
  • HCL: HCL is perceived to be extremely flexible in commercial models and strong in retaining key talent in its client accounts.
  • L&T Infotech: L&T Infotech is perceived to provide strong commercial flexibility as well as domain competence in the specific industries it operates in.
  • Tata Consultancy Services: Enterprises appreciate TCS’s technical capabilities and initiatives to drive strategic partnership with clients.

These results and other findings are explored in a recently published Everest Group report: “Customer (Dis)Satisfaction: Why Are Enterprises Unhappy with Their Service Providers?” The research summarizes over 130 interviews conducted with enterprises across the globe regarding the capabilities of their service providers with respect to applications, digital, cloud and infrastructure services. The report also details the technology investment priorities of enterprises and opportunity areas for service providers.

***Download Complimentary High-Resolution Graphics***

Key takeaways from the research findings are summarized in a set of high-resolution graphics available for complimentary download here. The graphics may be included in news coverage, with attribution to Everest Group.

The graphics include:

  • (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction: Nearly half of all enterprises are dissatisfied with their IT service providers
  • Enterprises’ technology investment priorities largely focused on innovation
  • IT service delivery: performance versus value
  • Size matters in selecting an IT services provider
  • The top 5 IT services providers

Everest Group Announces Winners of 2017 IT Service Provider of the Year Awards | Press Release

Accenture, Cognizant, IBM, TCS and Wipro again top the list of IT service providers who consistently place among top performers in Everest Group’s PEAK Matrix™ reports.

Everest Group—a consulting and research firm focused on strategic IT, business services and sourcing—today announced the winners of the 2017 PEAK Matrix Service Provider of the Year™ awards for IT services. The awards, now in their second year, recognize IT service providers who have demonstrated consistent leadership in the PEAK Matrix reports issued by Everest Group in the previous year.

In 2016, Everest Group published 21 PEAK Matrix reports, evaluating a total of 73 service providers in various segments of the IT services market. Twenty of the 73 providers are recognized in the 2017 PEAK Matrix Service Provider of the Year Awards.

“Our PEAK Matrix reports evaluate market success—using factors like revenue growth, deals won or renewed, margins generated, and so forth—as well as service capabilities, where the emphasis is on innovation, because that is how providers are differentiating themselves in the eyes of enterprises today,” said Jimit Arora, partner at Everest Group. “Throughout the year, Everest Group examines what providers are investing in, what type of intellectual capital they have, how they’re devising their sourcing strategies, and whether they are experimenting with new service models or engagements with their customers. By taking all of that into account, these PEAK Matrix Service Provider of the Year awards recognize the IT providers that truly set themselves apart.”

The 2017 PEAK Matrix Service Provider of the Year Awards for IT Services comprise:

  • The ITS Top 20 list—recognizing the top 20 providers of IT services (ITS) based on a consolidated scoring of rankings within the 2016 PEAK Matrix reports.

Accenture, Cognizant, IBM, TCS and Wipro won the top five spots (in that order). Accenture (which held the second position in 2016) has moved to the top of the list above Cognizant.

  • Top Leaders and Star Performers—Awarded to IT service providers who appeared in “Leader” or “Star Performers” positions most prevalently within five market segments: IT Services (overall), Healthcare and Life Sciences (HLS); Banking, Financial Services and Insurance (BFSI); Cloud and Infrastructure Services (CIS); and Application and Digital Services (ADS).

Companies recognized either as Leaders of the Year, Star Performers of the Year, or both, include Accenture, Atos, Capgemini, Cognizant, HCL, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, IBM, Tata Consultancy Services, VirtusaPolaris, and Wipro.

Accenture had a dominant presence in the 2017 honors, claiming the No.1 spot in the ITS Top 20 list as well as being “Leader of the Year” in the Overall IT Services and ADS categories. Accenture shared “Leader of the Year” honors with Cognizant in the HLS category.

Cognizant once again made a particularly strong showing, earning the No. 2 spot in the ITS Top 20 list as well as sharing “Leader of the Year” honors in two categories: BFSI and HLS. In addition, Cognizant was named “Star Performer of the Year” in the ADS category.

Capgemini and VirtusaPolaris shared the Star Performer of the Year award in the Overall IT Services category.

Five service providers improved their rankings:

  • Accenture moved from #2 to #1
  • Atos moved from #15 to #10
  • Capgemini moved from #9 to #7
  • CSC moved from #10 to #8
  • VirtusaPolaris moved from #16 to #15

New entrants to the ITS Top 20 list include Syntel (#17), Hexaware (#18) and NTT DATA (#20). Conversely, Fujitsu, Luxoft and Unisys dropped out of the Top 20 leaderboard.

***All winners are listed in the report, “2017 PEAK Matrix Service Provider of the Year Awards” available for complimentary download here.***

“Today’s enterprises must navigate a complex landscape of next-generation and legacy technologies, a global business footprint, and a complex provider portfolio,” said Abhishek Singh, practice director at Everest Group. “The PEAK Matrix Service Provider of the Year Awards are designed to help enterprise buyers identify the best of the best – the IT service providers with strong, broad-based capabilities and successful service strategies that align well with the evolving enterprise IT demand.”

Google to Alphabet – Lessons for Global Service Providers | Sherpas in Blue Shirts

“Google is not an unconventional company. We do not intend to become one,” said Larry Page, co-founder of Google, in his original founders letter in 2004, when Google went public. He reiterated that last week, when, on August 10, Google announced a new operating structure, creating the new entity Alphabet, with Google as a wholly-owned subsidiary.

Much has since been said about the company, its leadership, its transition, and its people. However, the more I read about Google (or should I say Alphabet now) and its reorganization, the more I am inclined to draw parallels between the internet behemoth and service providers, both Indian-heritage and multinationals. The way I see it, here are a few lessons service provides could take from the reorganization:

  1. Structure:

    Most, if not all, large organizations seek to carve out subsidiaries or focused business units to reorganize themselves. These units, with their respective heads, are then entrusted with the responsibility to scale the business. With “digital” being an almost-abused cliché, it is not difficult to hear about service providers hiving off separate digital business units. This unit or subsidiary is like a “child” of the “parent” service provider, which retains control of the child.

    Google defied the norm. Rather than creating a specialized business unit, it created an entirely new holding structure, effectively making Google, previously the parent, the child, and creating Alphabet as the parent. This umbrella organization now retains control, with the child (Google) getting a tunnel-vision focus.

    Lesson for service providers: Service providers that have attained enormous scale and that are at a stage where they can cause industry turbulence by their initiatives would do well to consider possibilities beyond the conventional norms and innovate even at that scale.

  2. Simplicity and control:

    When an organization grows too large, it becomes a management challenge to control it. Simplification becomes a necessity. By breaking down its business units into multiple, independent, and accountable entities, Google has created an operating structure that is much like a conglomerate.

    Seems simple enough, right? The challenge, however, is that the leadership of such an enterprise has to relinquish control of at least some of its units. By entrusting Mr. Pichai with the responsibility of running the world’s largest internet-based engine, Mr. Page has relinquished control of the company he co-founded. Surely, founders ceding control has to be personally challenging; however, the need to look beyond itself into something grander has clearly worked well for Google so far.

    Lesson for service providers: Management of colossal corporations should hand over control of highly functional cash cows to their number-twos and invest their time on pursuing grander ambitions. When the senior leadership (or the board) is loath to relinquish control, it indicates either a lack of faith in its next-generation leaders or an obsessive need to retain control or both, all of which culminate in lack of relevance and eventual obsolescence.

  3. Culture of radical innovation:

    The mention of Google always has the word innovation lurking around and for good reason. Google has always been known to be innovative in the way it perceives and solves problems. When it seemed to reach its comfort zone, it stirred the pot vigorously and conveyed its discomfort with status quo or even incremental changes.

    Lesson for service providers: Service providers should embrace such an outlook towards change and not be hesitant to adopt a radical approach. If a US$66 billion enterprise with one primary revenue source can do it, so can a much nimbler service provider with lesser risk exposure and higher market stability.

  4. Belief:

    Google has illustrated that moonshot vision and out-of-this-world ideas are not a necessity to become what it is. Pursuing what they believed were smart ideas and chasing them with relentless passion has given us products that have almost become a necessity.

    Often, during our interactions with service providers, we discuss their vision and philosophy about next-generation technologies and services. We seldom see those being relentlessly pursued, as the ideas fall victim to the next flavor of the day, management changes, or “change of strategic direction.”

    Lesson for service providers: The trick lies in being fast and nimble so that the idea is commercialized before the market moves on, and also relentless, so that innovators aren’t distracted by the whirlpool of daily business.

  5. Investor focus:

    Last but not the least nicety of Google’s restructuring is its ability to placate its investors. While the same can be said of many other firms, it is Google’s call to action and time to market that stand out. By creating a more accountable structure, Google alleviated a lot of investor concerns, which had been growing owing to the company’s cash-burning yet low-yielding moonshots.

    Lesson for service providers: If your initiatives, especially in the digital landscape, do not resonate with your investors, it is time to reconsider those. Service providers should create a more accountable structure for their digital initiatives and appease both customers and investors.

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