Tag: immigration

Everest Group Warns ‘Wait and See’ Won’t Cut It in New World Disorder | Press Release

Everest Group and other global services experts convene to discuss challenges of managing in uncertain times 

Washington is a fitting if not symbolic location for Everest Group’s next On Point Summit – “New World [Dis]Order: Managing in Turbulent Markets.”  Everest Group experts and other global services executives will convene at The Watergate Hotel in the U.S. capital on May 17 and 18 to discuss the rapidly evolving landscapes of globalization, automation, immigration and digital transformation.

The two-day event exclusively for enterprise sourcing executives features a slate of renowned thought leaders:

  • Uri Dadush, former director of international trade for the World Bank, will deliver the keynote address, “Globalization: Curve or Cliff?”
  • Peter Bendor-Samuel, CEO of Everest Group, and Rod Bourgeois, head of research for DeepDive Equity Research, will present “Immigration: The Latest and What to Expect”
  • Bill Price, first worldwide vice president of customer service at Amazon, author of “The Best Service is No Service,” and partner at Antuit, will join a panel to discuss “Digital Disruption: Pain or Gain”
  • Everest Group’s Jimit Arora, partner, IT services research, and Sarthak Brahma, vice president, pricing assurance, will discuss “Outsourcing Market: Pricing Collapse and Shifting Provider Landscape”

Other speakers include senior executives at leading North American financial institutions, digital retailers, natural resources companies, and more.

“Times of uncertainty can be career inflection points for senior executives who are armed with actionable data and insights and able to offer wise strategies for navigating perilous waters,” said Eric Simonson, managing partner at Everest Group. “So at this gathering of global services executives, we will put the facts on the table, exchange war stories, and engage in provocative discussions. The goal is to equip and inspire these executives to provide invaluable leadership, helping their companies not only to survive but also to emerge from the disorder as successful market leaders.”

***Enterprise executives may apply to attend the event at http://www1.everestgrp.com/OnPointSummit-May2017.html. ***

IT Firms Breathe Easy as Trump Proposes Merit-Based Immigration | In the News

Peter Bendor-Samuel, a global technology researcher, said Trump is “holding out a small olive branch to immigrants” and will stick to his American first protectionist stance. “Trumps statements pertaining to a merit-based system for immigration provided hope to Indians seeking to emigrate to the US with advanced degrees. However, it is unlikely that it signals less hostility toward the current H1-B system.”

Trump has been “very clear that he is seeking to eliminate the ability of services firms to utilize H1-B and L1 visas as a bridge to taking US jobs off-shore”, said Bendor-Samuel, adding “this position is gaining considerable support from both political parties”.

Read more at the Business Standard

Shedding Light on Proposed High-Wage Immigration Changes | Sherpas in Blue Shirts

Although US immigration reform is front and center in the media since the Trump administration took office, the US Congress has debated the need to change immigration legislation for years and has introduced significant proposals since 2013. An integral component is the H-1B work visas heavily used in the global services industry. Right now, the details of visa reform are a moving target, but there is a new angle in the shake-up – the proposed benefits are likely to benefit Global In-house Centers (GICs.

CNBC interviewed Congressman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) this week about proposed policy changes and his discussions with President Trump. Issa stated that Trump believes foreign service providers are gaming the H-1B visa program, undermining the intent of the program.

He explained that Trump may be more favorable toward a policy capping the minimum H-1B salary at $135,000, as opposed to the current minimum salary of $60,000. Two other minimum salary proposals are on the table: $100,000 proposed by Issa and $132,000 proposed by Rep. Lofgren (D-Calif.). In essence, all three plans thus emphasize focus on allowing visas for high-skilled labor, and Issa affirmed that he expects Congress will pass bipartisan immigration reform dealing with high skills this year.

Two Greatest Impacts from Proposed Changes

It’s still unclear, but it’s likely that the changes won’t affect US providers and tech companies to the same degree as the third-party service providers in India. Changes aim to raise their onshore costs. This will significantly raise costs for H-1B-dependent providers such as Cognizant, Infosys and TCS. Although these firms currently enjoy a competitive advantage over Accenture, Capgemini and IBM, the advantage will narrow and potentially go away with the increased costs.

The second greatest impact from proposed changes is the GICs. Notably, the proposed legislation does not impact firms with GICs. In fact, it is likely to make the Indian GIC model (or captives) more attractive, thereby increasing employment opportunities in these Indian firms and giving these providers a greater share of the offshore pie. Why? Because reducing or restricting the available pool of H-1B talent when there is rising demand for US-based tech talent is likely to create wage inflation.

Although rising tech wages in the US will create a tailwind for all offshore models, GICs may benefit disproportionally because, unlike third-party providers, GICs don’t depend on the H-1B onshore model.

Digital Revolution Impact on Job Creation

Visa reform is not the only factor disrupting the labor arbitrage model. The emerging digital revolution holds the promise of significant productivity increases in the existing workforce – often as much as 30-60 percent. Coupled with US companies’ increasing risk of reputation damage for using offshore services, I believe the move to digital services will accelerate, as its value proposition includes the advantage of onshore delivery and relies less on service delivery based on the offshore labor arbitrage model.

H-1B-dependent service providers will likely use digital technologies and business models to offset the impact of rising wages. A short-term rise in employment is probable, given that it takes some time to implement digital productivity improvements.

No matter which side you’re on, the offshore labor arbitrage market is shifting. The US government definitely is moving aggressively in the direction of significant visa reform, especially focusing on high-skilled workers. However, the other items high on the loaded US policy agenda – especially repealing the Affordable Care Act and changing tax laws) could become a factor moving visa reform to a lower priority.

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