Shrotima Wadhwa
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Shrotima Wadhwa

Shrotima Wadhwa is Assistant Manager, Information Services at Everest Group and is located in our Gurgaon, India office

What Enterprises Can Learn About Cloud Adoption from Project JEDI | Blog

By | Blog, Cloud & Infrastructure

Enterprises must consider many different factors when building their cloud adoption strategy. It’s not easy, but the decisions are critically important. Learning the smart – and not so smart – choices other organizations have made can be enormously valuable. Project JEDI is an example of what not to do.

The background

In 2018, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) launched the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure (JEDI) project to accelerate its adoption of cloud architecture and services. The contract was written to award the US$10 billion deal to a single commercial provider to build a cloud computing platform that supports weapons systems and classified data storage. With this ambitious project, the Pentagon intends to drive full-scale implementations and better return on investment on next-generation technologies including AI, IoT, and machine learning.

Here are key learnings from Project JEDI that enterprises should take very seriously.

1. Not to do: Pick a single cloud provider without evaluating others
To do: Explore a multi-hybrid cloud model

The JEDI contract’s fundamental issue arose from the fact that it considered a single cloud provider to chart out its entire cloud strategy. This caused great stakeholder dissonance, in large part because alignment with just one provider could result in losing out on ongoing innovation from other providers.

Because a single cloud strategy offers advantages including lower upfront cost and streamlined systems, enterprises often adopt this approach. But a multi-hybrid architecture allows them to tap into the best of multiple providers’ capabilities and stay ahead on the technology curve.

A well-planned multi-hybrid cloud strategy offers the following benefits:

2. Not to do: Ignore open cloud options
To do: Consider application interoperability and portability in cloud design

Project JEDI is completely dependent on a single cloud model, which exposes it to significant lock-in risks such as threat to transfer of data, application, or infrastructure. All of these can have a lasting negative impact on business continuity.

An open cloud model allows application interoperability and portability, and saves enterprises from vendor lock-in. Enterprises should be open to exploring open source or open design technologies for cloud. They should also consider implementing DevOps tools, container technology, and configuration management tools, as they will allow them to deploy their applications to diverse IT environments. All these options reduce the lock-in risks that stem from proprietary configurations, and enable organizations to easily, and with minimal technical costs, switch between providers based on business objectives.

3. Not to do: Be biased towards an incumbent
To do: Evaluate cloud vendors by aligning the service portfolio to workload requirements

The Pentagon recently awarded the JEDI contract to Microsoft. However, in the initial stages, the project garnered massive attention for its alleged preference to Amazon Web Services (AWS,) which has been involved in multiple government contracts for providing cloud support. Critics of the contract cited that an alleged unfair relationship between DoD employees and AWS would lead to inherent bias and rigged competitive bidding.

While existing relationships are important and can deliver strong value, enterprises should carefully evaluate their vendor portfolio against their workload needs. In most cases, a combination of different vendors will provide the most optimum solution. For example, Java workloads are known to work best with AWS, .NET workloads work best with Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform (GCP) is most suited for analytics workloads.

4. Not to do: Lose sight of stakeholders while moving ahead
To do: Have all stakeholders on board

A wide range of stakeholders are involved in selecting a cloud provider, and each of their needs, interests, and pre-existing biases must be addressed to avoid project derailment. For example, President Trump’s distaste for Amazon is cited as the prime reason that the JEDI project was awarded to Microsoft rather than AWS.
One of cloud project leaders’ most critical responsibilities is identifying and understanding stakeholders’ vendor biases and bringing them into alignment with business objectives if the biases are based on something other than facts.

The DoD’s approach to Project JEDI led to a prolonged delay in its aspirations in adopting cloud architecture and services and developing leading cloud-based AI capabilities. Avoiding the DOD’s missteps will help enterprises more quickly shape and secure a cloud-based contract that satisfies all stakeholders and supports their organizations’ business agenda.

What are your thoughts around the JEDI case and what enterprises can learn not to do, and to do, from it? Please share your thoughts with us at [email protected] and [email protected].

 

Banks Increasingly Tapping the Extended Ecosystem to Reverse Their Fortune | Blog

By | Banking, Financial Services & Insurance, Blog

To reverse their precipitous loss of competitive advantage and market share, traditional banks are increasingly transforming themselves from financial products/services providers into customer lifestyle experience orchestrators. One of the key levers they’re pushing to bring about this innovation turnaround is expansion of their ecosystem to include academics, regulators, FinTechs, telecom firms, and technology vendors.

Everest Group’s recently-released report, Guide to Building and Managing the Banking Innovation Ecosystem – Case Study and Examples from 40 Global Banks, revealed four distinct ways in which banks are working with the ecosystem to drive their innovation strategy.

FinTechs

This is all about exploiting the symbiotic relationship between banks and FinTechs. Serving as “enablers,” FinTechs are helping banks provide more choices to customers and expand the set of services and features in their current offering. For example, Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) collaborated with WaveApps to integrate invoicing, accounting and business financial insights into its online business banking platform. This enables RBC’s small business clients to seamlessly manage their full business financial services’ needs — from banking and bookkeeping to invoicing — in a single place with a single sign-on.

Taking on the “enabler” role, banks allow FinTechs to gain access to their customers, data, capital, experience, and platform. This collaboration helps FinTechs avoid the challenges they face in scaling their services independently.

Banks and FinTechs are also combining their unique strengths to solve specific business/customer issues in co-branded partnerships. As the banking industry moves towards lifestyle orchestration services, banks need to launch products that cut across industries such as travel & hospitality, manufacturing, and retail & CPG. This can be achieved by meaningful cross-industry collaborations like the one between Citi and Lazada Group, an e-Commerce site in Southeast Asia. The partnership allows Citi card holders to enjoy a discount of up to 15 percent on selected days when shopping on Lazada, while shoppers who sign up for a new Citi credit card receive additional discounts on Lazada. The move drives growth in Citi’s cards business via increased customer loyalty.

Internal innovation

To build their internal innovation ecosystem, banks are conducting hackathons and establishing digital R&D hubs that help them retain talent and bridge the digital skills gap. For instance, Bank of America launched its Global Technology and Operations Development Program – which is called GT&O University – to train workers for new and evolving roles related to artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. This has helped the bank not only upskill its workforce but also enhance its retention-oriented employee value proposition. And banks, including ING, are tapping open banking by providing external developers, industry innovators, and clients with access to their APIs. This helps them expand their offerings, provide new channels to serve customers, build new experiences for clients, and enable open collaboration.

Investments

Banks are closely tracking the innovation ecosystem through multiple programs such as investments, incubation support, and partnerships to avoid threats of disruption and competitive disadvantage. This includes investments across academic institutions, startups, and service providers. Interestingly, our research suggests that banks are likely to continue investing in startups via acquisitions or venture capital financing to accelerate their transformation efforts. This is evident from TD Bank’s recent acquisition of Layer 6, a Canada-based AI startup, which adds new capabilities to TD’s growing base of innovation talent and know-how.

Co-innovation

Through co-innovation partnerships with startups, consortiums, academic institutions, and technology giants, banks are jointly developing innovative solutions and technology. Leading banks are forming consortiums with other banks, technology firms, and other participants across industries to solve industry-wide issues such as cybersecurity, API security, and regulatory technology, building platforms and standards for the industry. For instance, TD Bank joined the Canadian Institute for Cybersecurity to co-develop new cyber risk management technologies. And HSBC is working with IBM to jointly establish a cognitive intelligence solution combining optical character recognition with robotics to make global trade safer and more efficient.

To learn more about banks’ leverage of the extended ecosystem to drive competitive advantage, and details on the “why’s” and “where’s” banks are focusing their innovation efforts, please see our report titled “Guide to Building and Managing the Banking Innovation Ecosystem – Case Study and Examples from 40 Global Banks.

IT Services Opportunities with the NHS: Patient Care and Advanced Technologies | Sherpas in Blue Shirts

By | Blog, Healthcare & Life Sciences

It should come as no surprise that global services activity in the U.K. has dropped significantly in all sectors in the aftermath of the Brexit referendum. Indeed, according to our Transaction Intelligence database of sourcing deals, in the healthcare space, the U.K.’s National Health Service (NHS) awarded 13 outsourcing deals in 2015, 11 in 2016, but only four in the first half of 2017.

However, our research indicates that the policy of patient-centric care introduced by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in 2012 is likely to drive ample long-term opportunities for innovative IT service providers that offer technology enablers.

EG KTFor example, under the NHS’s RightCare initiative, the NHS may look to accelerate the adoption of value-based care. Funding is focused on allocative value (how well assets are distributed to different areas of healthcare), technical value (how well resources are used to achieve valid outcomes), and personalized value (determined by how well an outcome matches patient expectation). Additionally, with increasing demand for telemedicine, NHS trusts will be on the lookout for providers that develop mobile applications aimed at remote healthcare management to support the growing importance of care at home for chronic conditions.

A robust cybersecurity network is equally imperative in the wake of recent instances of data breaches such as the March 2017 WannaCry attack, in which the medical records of 26 million NHS patients were hacked. Service providers can help the NHS protect its IT infrastructure from malicious cyber attacks by offering threat intelligence solutions, threat detection and mitigation applications, Blockchain-powered Electronic Health Records (EHRs), and persona-based security platforms.

While third-party providers can profit from these long-term opportunities, they need to be cognizant of the changing competitor landscape, particularly from tech start-ups that are testing the waters to realize potential demand in the U.K. healthcare sector. For instance, DeepMind, a London-based artificial intelligence start-up, worked with the NHS in 2016 on technology to improve care coordination.

To take advantage of growing consumerism in the U.K. healthcare space – e.g., e-Referral and e-Consult services – we recommend that IT service providers increase their investments in growing technological areas such as security, mobility, analytics, and IoT. But first and foremost, they must offer services that focus on patient care. Doing so would help the NHS avoid a repeat of its failed National Programme for IT, which was aimed at cost savings and efficiency, but was abandoned after nine years at a cost of £10 billion in 2011.

We will continue to watch this space and actively share our thoughts and perspectives. In the meantime, you can stay up-to-date on our latest insights in the healthcare domain through our dedicated research on the Healthcare & Life Sciences sector.