Tag: TCS

Size Does Matter – The Real Pecking Order of Indian IT Service Providers | Sherpas in Blue Shirts

Earlier today, Cognizant reported its financial results for the first quarter of 2011, bringing to an end the earnings season for the Big-5 Indian IT providers – affectionately referred to as WITCH (Wipro, Infosys, TCS, Cognizant, and HCL). Cognizant’s results were yet again distinctive: US$1.37 billion in revenues in 1Q11, which represents QoQ growth of 4.6 percent and YoY growth of 42.9 percent. The latest financial results reaffirmed – yet again – Cognizant’s growth leadership compared to its peers and are a testament to Cognizant’s superb client engagement model.

Q1 2011 financial highlights for WITCH:

WITCH Q1-2011 Financial Highlights

In a recent blog post, my colleague Vikash Jain commented on the changes in the IT services leaderboard, and especially the questions and speculation on the relative positions of Wipro and Cognizant in the Indian IT services landscape. Cognizant’s 1Q11 revenues are now just US$29 million below Wipro’s IT services revenues, and based on current momentum, Cognizant could overtake Wipro as early as 2Q11, making it the third largest Indian IT major in quarterly revenue terms. The guidance provided by the two companies for the next quarter – Cognizant (US$1.45 billion) and Wipro (US$1.39-1.42 billion) – provides further credence to the projected timelines.

How important is this upcoming change in the relatively static rank order of the Indian IT industry (the last change happened in January 2009 post the Satyam scandal)? Not very, in our opinion. As and when this happens, the event will indeed create news headlines and the occasional blog entry, but the change in rankings does not imply a meaningful change to the overall IT landscape. Further, other than providing Wipro with even more conviction to make the changes required to recapture a faster growth trajectory, the new rank order does not suggest any changes in the delivery capabilities of either of these organizations.

As we advise our clients on selecting service providers, we believe that it is more important to understand the service provider’s depth of capability and experiences in the buyer organization’s specific vertical industry. While total revenues and financial stability are important enterprise-level criteria, performance in the vertical industry bears greater relevance and significance as buyers evaluate service providers. In our 1Q11 Market Vista report, we examine the CY 2010 revenues of the WITCH group to determine the pecking order in three of the largest verticals from a global sourcing adoption perspective – banking, financial services and insurance (BFSI); healthcare and life sciences; and energy and utilities (E&U).

As we recognize there are differences in the way these providers segment results, for simplicity we are relying on reported segmentation (which we believe does not meaningfully alter the results). The exhibit below summarizes the results of our assessment:

Industry leaderboard for WITCH:

WITCH Industry Leaders1

Our five key takeaways:

  1. The ranking of WITCH based on enterprise revenues has limited correlation to industry vertical rankings. The leader in each of the three examined industries is different.
  2. In BFSI, while TCS is the clear leader, Cognizant is rapidly closing in on Infosys for the second spot. (Note: Wipro is already #4 in this vertical).
  3. In Healthcare and Life Sciences, Cognizant emerges as the clear leader with 2010 revenues greater than those of Wipro, TCS, and HCL combined. (Note: Infosys does not report segment revenues for Healthcare).
  4. In E&U, Wipro leads the pack and is expected to widen the gap through its acquisition of SAIC’s oil and gas business. TCS achieved the highest growth in 2010 to move to third position ahead of HCL (TCS was #4 in 2009) and narrow the gap with Infosys (Note: Cognizant does not report E&U revenues).
  5. Finally, the above ranks are going to change quickly. Based on the results announced for the first calendar quarter of 2011 alone, we anticipate a change in the second position for each of the three examined verticals:
    • Cognizant’s Q1 BFSI revenue of US$570 million is nearly identical to that of Infosys’ US$572 million
    • TCS’ Q1 Healthcare and Life Sciences revenue at US$ 119 million is higher than Wipro’s US$111 million (which also includes services)
    • TCS reported Q1 E&U revenues of US$103 million, versus Infosys’ US$93 million

While it will be interesting to see the impact on a full year basis, the above changes in momentum already indicate further changes in the industry leaderboard before the end of the year.

On an unrelated note, by the time we revisit the Wipro versus Cognizant debate when the Indian majors announce their Q2 results starting mid-July, WITCH will assume an additional meaning – the last installment of the Harry Potter movies is due for release on July 15, 2011!

How Will the IT/BPO Industry Leaderboard Change? | Sherpas in Blue Shirts

This past weekend, many people were glued to their televisions watching the 2011 Masters Golf Tournament at Augusta National. As the days rolled by, the leaderboard changed in some surprising ways – the young McIlroy slid a long way from Number 1 on Day 1; Tiger Woods finally showed his old spark and stayed steadily within the top 5 throughout the game; and Charl Schwartzel jumped into the front-runner spot to take the Green Jacket.

While we now know the Masters winner, there is significant speculation on the changes in the IT services leaderboard, both today and going forward. The market is rife with questions on where Wipro and Cognizant will end up this season. The discussion on C-level changes at Infosys made a leading Indian newspaper speculate on issues it may be facing, with TCS speeding on and Cognizant being on steroids and catching up quickly. The next day, analysts said TCS would continue to outpace the other TWITCH majors as the quarterly results season starts.

We will know the answers to these questions in the next few weeks, after all companies report their numbers. But the more important long-term question is, what else will change in that leaderboard? Will we see more M&As, new entrants, or exits? And fundamentally, what will the future structure of the IT services industry be, and who will the winners be?

In a recent meeting, a CEO of an IT services company made an interesting point about there being steps at the US$500 million, $1 billion, $5 billion, and $10 billion marks, and that it is progressively challenging to get to the next level. It was clear he was thinking that some, including those in the $2+ billion scale, will struggle to reach the next level, and some will stabilize in their current or adjacent level.

The TWITCH discussion is interesting, but then there are the mid-tier IT players. We are just past the first quarter of 2011, and already three (iGate, Patni, and Headstrong) no longer exist, at least not in their original form. From all we hear or understand, several more may go before the end of 2011.

Then there are continuous speculations about pure play BPO players being shopped about. The rumor that Cognizant will take out Genpact has been around for ages. EXL is up for some action, and the market is abuzz with other speculations. As one of my colleagues recently blogged – will the Indian pure play BPO companies survive in the same shape and form past 2011 or 2012?

Net, net, here is the big picture. Some large Tier 1 players are struggling, mid-sized IT is not necessarily the best place to be, and pure play BPO companies are a vanishing tribe.

All this raises more questions: What is the future structure of the global services industry? Will Accenture, IBM, Dell, the Japanese majors, TCS and probably a few others become the super majors by 2015 or 2020, and will the rest need to find their own places under the sun? What other categories and groups of service providers will exist, and what will their characteristics be, for example, regional specialists, vertical specialists, etc.?

Irrespective of how the industry evolves, consolidation will continue, and the M&A juggernaut will roll. This business generates cash, and doesn’t require a lot to sustain it…so companies will invest in buying capabilities, assets, businesses, and people in attempts to win top spots on the leaderboard.

We certainly are headed for some interesting months ahead. Is anyone betting on who the winners will be at the end of 2011?

Indian Heritage Providers Are Achieving Differentiation | Sherpas in Blue Shirts

One of my partners recently returned from a conference remarking that he could randomly put any service provider’s logo on any of the collateral being distributed and nobody would notice.  Everyone’s message was essentially the same as their competitors. It is difficult to differentiate among the Indian heritage providers. Or at least it has been. Recently, three of the Tier 1 firms have emerged with highly divergent and (to date) successful differences at the strategic intent level.

Before we look at what these three firms are doing, let’s look at how the maturation of the global services industry is manifesting itself:

  • Clients are becoming progressively thoughtful about which providers they want in their portfolio, and are actively working through portfolio rationalization to achieve that mix
  • New logos are increasingly hard to come by and expensive to acquire; as a result, providers are focusing their efforts on growing business within existing clients – wallet share is king
  • The difference between ITO and BPO providers is blurring, and clients are increasingly looking for a provider that can deliver services across a wide range of areas
  • As client firms mature in their use of labor arbitrage, they are increasingly delegating decision making, giving rise to the purchasing function as a more influential player; this is starting to commoditize the offshore services market and is putting pressure on price
  • Simultaneous to the delegation of decision making, senior client firm executives are increasingly wondering and questioning what they should do next, specifically beyond arbitrage, to increase value.

These dynamics are challenging the Indian heritage Tier 1 providers to evolve their strategies and tactics in order to retain and grow their client bases, as well as secure new deals with a next generation flavor.

So how are three of the biggest addressing these issues per their strategic intent?

TCS’s strategic intent is “flawless execution.” TCS’s clients and the market are increasingly viewing TCS as a superb operator with a well-polished and effective talent management model.  Many view TCS as the leading example of how to deliver consistently high quality work at attractive prices. It invests significantly in becoming its clients’ strategic delivery partner, including focused initiatives to build relevant IP. TCS has been very thoughtful in segmenting the market and organizing its business by vertical industries. The multinational provider it is most similar to is IBM. Both have a large client base, are very deliberate in their strategies, are highly intentional in their investments, are very focused on deep and broad client relationships, and work consistently to identify and nurture them.

Infosys’ strategic intent is being a “transformation partner.”Infosys has invested considerably in building a large and impactful consulting organization in order to combine consulting with delivery to achieve transformation for its clients. That objective is being bolstered by its 3.0 co-creation strategy, which is a move further down the line of transformation. It is achieving many successes, and is considered a formidable player. The ongoing transition of senior leadership at Infosys seems to be well along its path with clear succession planning underway and significant investment to develop the next generation of management. Yet, Infosys is taking a challenging strategic intent route as it is squarely emulating Accenture’s strategy. The transformation hill is steep to climb because of the difficulties involved in combining consulting with delivery. Accenture has done well, but others have struggled to succeed along this path. Infosys’ ability to resolve the key conflicts between consulting and delivery will determine its long-term success.

Cognizant’s strategic intent is superb “client engagement.”Cognizant is simply the best at working with clients on business issues. Its secret sauce is an ability to engage with clients on problems and pull through consulting and delivery services. This is different than Accenture’s and Infosys’ transformation model in that Cognizant focuses on the client relationship and client engagement by working through the suite of problems currently on the client’s plate, as compared to game-changing transformation. Cognizant invests significantly in highly empowered onsite teams, and its delivery and consulting organizations are tuned to be responsive to the client engagement team. This overall model and strategy is quite different than any other Indian or multinational firm, and is achieving significant growth and profitability returns.

Each of these strategic intent approaches appear successful to date, and has moved each of these three firms to a superior level of performance. Indeed, as clients increasingly recognize the clear difference among these players, and other providers follow their lead to secure true differentiation, we will see a new Tier 1 emerge in the Indian heritage provider space.

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