Tag

healthcare

What Pain will You Experience if the AHCA Bill Becomes Law? | Sherpas in Blue Shirts

By | Sherpas in Blue Shirts
  • Health insurance lost for 24 million U.S. consumers
  • Billions of dollars of care investment marginalized
  • Providers’ margins eroded by payers
  • And a five-year setback to the healthcare system

These are potential side effects if the U.S. House of Representatives- approved American Health Care Act (AHCA) bill becomes a law. Let’s look at the impact the law would have on the key constituencies.

Healthcare providers

With the most needy (the sick and the elderly) portion of the population left uninsured, the healthcare providers will once again be expected to foot a large part of their healthcare bills due to lack of coverage, non-payments, use of ER services, etc.

Healthcare consumers

With premium increases, credits/subsidies being based on age instead of income level, and states’ ability to change or waive pre-existing health condition coverage, a large percentage of older, lower income, and infirmed consumers would likely opt out of having coverage altogether. Young and healthy people would have less incentive to get insurance coverage.

Healthcare payers

The overall theme of the bill would result in a significant decline in volume of work managed by payers. That said, there would be numerous key operational implications for both private and government payers including:

  • Product development: Payers would end up having state specific plans, leading to increased administrative work around plan design and development activities. This would likely have a cascading effect on downstream processes (policy servicing, network and care management, and claims management) which are expected to become more complex and specialized.
  • Claims: Claims volume would likely dwindle, particularly among the old and ill, as a large percentage would have opted out of coverage.
  • Policy servicing: Payers would likely experience a significant uptick in queries from patients and providers, as uncertainty around topics such as eligibility, verification, and premium collection amplifies. However, demand for certain processes, such as HIX support, would likely be sluggish.
  • Care and network management: Care management programs would likely take a backseat, given their significant cost to enrollees and providers. Additionally, companies that had invested heavily in such programs could see decline in their ROI. Lower patient volumes might drive payers to tighten their provider network, leading to less work around network management activities.
  • Government (Medicaid): Reduced federal spend on Medicaid would likely push states towards a modular approach, and maybe even a shift towards a managed care construct.

With a decline in volume of work, it might not be surprising to see some of the larger payers insource certain processes.

The Healthcare IT and BPO service providers

A lesser volume of work across various value-chain segments would translate into lower revenue for third-party vendors. In fact, even though a law hasn’t yet been enacted, the healthcare business in some of the key players, such as Accenture and Cognizant, is already growing at a slower rate than their overall company growth rate. This impact could extend to the overall outsourcing industry. On the other hand, if states decided to exercise the power granted to them differently, service providers could also expect to see increase in the complexity of work around certain functions such as policy servicing and claims management.

Additionally, the ratified law might just be the impetus that mid-to-large buyers without GICs need to opt for bundled IT and BPO deals, which were traditionally a feature of mid-sized buyers.

Of course, the above-mentioned implications are for the bill in its current form. However, moderate Republican senators might well make massive changes to it, especially after the public outrage over certain parts of the bill.

It is going to be tough time of uncertainty for all stakeholders until a law – in whatever shape and form – is passed. In the meantime, payers and healthcare providers need to work closely with their respective service providers to ensure they stay afloat and come out on the right side of fence when the dust settles.
For a detailed analysis comparing the AHCA and ACA, please see our report titled: Acing Uncertainties in the Payer Market: The Trump Cards.