Tag

Global In-house Centers

Models for a Shared Services / GIC Setup | On-Demand Webinar

By | Webinars

Originally presented live on Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Access On Demand

This 18-minute on-demand webinar is the second in a series of brief, targeted sessions designed to help service delivery leaders set up leading, effective, and successful delivery centers.

As enterprises increasingly adopt the Shared Services Center (also known as Global In-house Center or GIC) model, they often grapple with questions regarding the key set-up elements. This particular session covers the following topics:
• Range of setup options available
• Advantages and challenges prevalent within each option
• Market adoption and expected trends
• Decision variables in selecting the right setup model

Who should view, and why?
The content is geared to senior enterprise executives, including: leaders responsible for strategic outsourcing, transformation, and project management, as well as business unit executives. The session is designed for those looking to strengthen their understanding of the setup-related aspects of establishing Shared Services Centers or GICs.

Presenters:
Marvin Newell
Partner, Consulting
Everest Group

Aditya Verma
Vice-President, Global Sourcing
Everest Group

Key Elements of a Shared Services / GIC Setup | On-Demand Webinar

By | Webinars

Originally presented live on Thursday, December 6, 2018

Access On Demand

This 25-minute on-demand webinar is the first in a series of brief, targeted sessions designed to help service delivery leaders set up leading, effective, and successful delivery centers.

This must-see session addresses how to:
• Articulate business objectives, the center’s role, and its anticipated business impact
• Evaluate setup options, including location, talent model, and commercial & legal options
• Prepare and assess the business case for the center
• Develop the implementation blueprint, including the timeline and sequencing of activities, vendor selection and coordination, and operating and governance models

Who should view, and why?
The content is geared to senior enterprise executives, including: leaders responsible for strategic outsourcing, transformation, and project management, as well as business unit executives.

Presenters:
H. Karthik
Partner, Global Sourcing
Everest Group

Marvin Newell
Partner, Consulting
Everest Group

Is Your Shared Services Center / GIC Driving the Digital Agenda? | Webinar

By | Webinars

Complimentary 60-minute webinar held on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 | 9 a.m. CDT, 10 a.m. EDT, 3 p.m. BST, 7:30 p.m. IST

DOWNLOAD THE PRESENTATION

Questions we’ll address:

  • For what kinds of digital initiatives are enterprises leveraging the shared services / GIC model?
  • How are shared services / Global In-house Centers (GICs), and corporate digital teams working together?
  • What supporting programs should you implement to develop and retain top digital talent?
  • How much are organizations investing in digital initiatives, and are they satisfied with their investments?

Businesses around the globe are exploring and adopting digital services at a record pace, driven by changing consumer demands, emerging disruptive technologies, evolving regulations, and increasing cost/margin pressures. Many organizations are finding that their shared services centers / GICs are ideally positioned to orchestrate their digital services management and development, enabling tight integration between the delivery center(s) and the core business while also ensuring optimal growth.

Who should attend, and why?
This webinar will offer real-world insights into how organizations can effectively leverage their delivery centers for digital enablement.

The content is geared to senior enterprise executives – CIOs, CTOs, Chief Digital Officers, Heads of the Global In-house Center (GIC) / Shared Services Center (SSC) / Global Business Service (GBS), Senior Strategy Executives, and Global Sourcing Managers.

Presenters
Michel Jannsen
Chief Research Guru
Everest Group

Rohitashwa Aggarwal
Practice Director
Everest Group

Parul Jain
Senior Analyst
Everest Group

Moderator
Alan Wolfe
Senior Vice President
Everest Group

Talent Management in Global In-house Centers: Are You Future-Ready? | Sherpas in Blue Shirts

By | Blog, Shared Services/Global In-house Centers, Talent

There’s no question that digital technological advancements, evolving business requirements such as changing consumer needs and faster time to market, and a heightened focus on customer experience are significantly changing the profile of skills needed to deliver services. As most global in-house centers (GIC) are already facing challenges in hiring people with the right skills for the future, it is concerning that their talent-related preparation for such a tectonic shift is lacking.

Talent Management GIC_1

Here are four talent management imperatives for GICs to develop the workforce of the future.

1. Identification of Skills Gap

As automation and other technological advancements kick in, human skills, such as innovation, design thinking, problem solving, empathy, and ethical thinking will become more critical. Identification of skills gap will be pivotal for GICs’ talent acquisition and development strategy. A recent Everest Group study of 80+ GICs across India, Philippines, and Poland identified multiple, and difficult to hire, skills that are likely to become more important in the future.

Talent Management GIC_2

2. Upskill/Reskill Current Workforce

Firms’ talent challenges will intensify with the automation of transactional services. They will face the dual risks of a large existing workforce with many skills that are likely to become redundant, while struggling to find talent with the right skills for their future needs. Upskilling/reskilling existing talent is an important lever for GICs to address these challenges while preserving their trained workforce with string domain/industry know-how. (See our detailed report on upskilling/reskilling in GICs for additional perspectives.)

3. Evolve Talent Acquisition and Development Strategy

As GICs look to develop a future-proof talent strategy, they will need to think outside the box to tap into alternative sources of talent. Opportunities include hackathons, hiring from startups and other industries, project-based partnerships with specialist agencies, and flexible resourcing. From an L&D perspective, traditional classroom model needs to evolve as learning is becoming more real-time, customized, and digitized, e.g., MOOCs, simulation, and gamification.

4. Agile Human Capital Planning

With a dramatic decline in skills’ half-life, particularly in the technical space, GICs need to identify and focus on skills that are more likely to be critical for their growth. A more frequent approach to human capital planning might be essential to account for rapid changes in these skills.

While many GICs are still taking a wait and watch approach to the talent management issue, some have already embarked on this transformational journey. And those that are proactively addressing it are reaping big rewards.

Watch this space for more insights and success stories. And if you’d like to share your challenges, successes, or questions with us, please feel free to write us at [email protected] or [email protected].

Six RPA Implementation Pitfalls GICs Must Avoid | Sherpas in Blue Shirts

By | Blog

Enterprises are increasingly leveraging their Global In-house Centers (GICs) to drive automation efforts across the globe. Per recent interactions with over 100 enterprises, GICs, and technology vendors to develop our new report, “RPA Implementation in GICs – Learnings and Best Practices,” we determined that more than 50 percent of enterprises are already driving or plan to drive their global RPA initiatives from Centers of Excellence in offshore/nearshore GICs.

While GICs are well positioned to drive RPA, the extent of success varies and the journey is not easy. To succeed, GICs need to avoid the following six pitfalls, and follow the lead of best-in-class GIC adopters of RPA.

Driving RPA without Enterprise Support

Successful RPA initiatives are a result of strong collaboration between enterprise and GIC leadership. Best-in-class GICs involve enterprise leadership from the beginning of their RPA journey.

Driving RPA in Functional Silos

Successful RPA initiatives involve stakeholders from relevant functions – e.g., IT, operations, risk, and legal – not just the operations team (recipients of automation solutions.) RPA initiatives in some organizations reside under the strategy and innovation function, rather than being led by IT or operations.

Driving RPA in a Decentralized Manner

Through centralized efforts, GICs are able to document and share knowledge across the enterprise, thereby, reducing cost, effort, and time to implementation.

Relying Excessively on Third-Party Vendors

Best-in-class adopters have a strong emphasis on developing in-house capabilities, for example, product development / customizing RPA solutions to suit process requirements.

Selecting Complex Processes at the Start

Successful GICs have avoided the temptation to automate high complexity processes or explore end-to-end automation, and instead have focused on transactional/repetitive/rule-based processes that are easier to implement.

Viewing RPA as a Silver Bullet

Successful GICs view RPA as one of the tools to improve operations by way of error reduction, productivity enhancement, and SLA compliance improvement. Process standardization and reengineering both play key roles in driving the effectiveness of RPA solutions.

Best-in-class GICs have evolved from execution to enabling business units across multiple locations to implement RPA solutions independently. To learn more about the best practices employed by mature GIC adopters of RPA, read our report, “RPA Implementation in GICs – Learnings and Best Practices.” And if you are driving RPA from your GIC, we’d love to hear your story. Feel free to share your opinions and stories on how your GIC is evolving in its RPA journey with [email protected] or [email protected].

Also, keep a lookout for our upcoming report on Enterprise RPA adoption, which leverages our robust Pinnacle Model™ methodology to compare enterprise performance on RPA adoption.

Finally, we’re in the process of conducting a first-of-its-kind survey, the results of which will reveal the state of digital adoption and what separates Pinnacle GICs™ from others. We invite you to join your peers and participate in this survey, today!

From Captive to Catalyst: The Next Milestone in the Global In-house Center Evolution Story | Sherpas in Blue Shirts

By | Blog, Shared Services/Global In-house Centers

At a conference I attended recently on the role of global in-house centers (GICs) in digital and RPA, one of the speakers asked everyone to imagine what their organizations would look like in the future. The answers from a room full of enterprise and GIC leaders were varied and fascinating. My personal favorite was the one where robots will manage all forms of work while people relax on a beach, soaking up the sun, and sipping their piña coladas. Tempting as that sounds, I don’t expect it to happen anytime soon.

But what is happening now is a flurry of changes in the business environment globally. Amidst recent geopolitical developments in the U.S. and U.K., increasing talks of protectionist policies, the advancement of RPA and other service optimization technologies, and regulatory pressures affecting the global services sector, GICs and shared services centers find themselves at a crossroads. As the global services sector moves from an arbitrage first to a digital first delivery model, GICs have an opportunity to break away from the orthodox boundaries by taking the road less traveled, and enhance their role in enterprises’ global sourcing strategy.

Everest Group has seen first hand the evolving role of GICs, which has expanded beyond providing low- cost delivery to being agents of change – or catalysts – for enterprises’ back- and middle-office services.

Now, GICs are at an inflection point in their evolution journey, well positioned to take on this enhanced role driven by: increased endorsement from the enterprise and the shift towards insourcing; a strong foundation and ability to offer an insider’s view; tight integration with the existing core business; and strong adjacency with existing focus on driving efficiency and optimization.

What does the future of GICs look like?

Global Services - CatalystTo successfully undertake changes within their enterprises and redefine their role from captive to catalyst, GICs need to:

  1. Drive business impact and thought leadership
  2. Develop global leaders and talent/skills
  3. Play a pivotal role in the transformation of processes and service delivery
  4. Lead organizations through digital disruptions in global services.

Here are Everest Group’s recommendations on how GICs can capitalize on this opportunity:

  • Redefine the art of the possible, and adopt a business outcome-oriented mindset, which is significantly different from the current delivery mindset
  • Identify and prioritize investments, such as their choice of functional and technology segments, and the best approach to gaining more than just incremental growth
  • Change their talent model (e.g., hire for learnability, strengthen culture of innovation) and operating model (e.g., different onshore-offshore collaboration models due to agile/DevOps) to catalyze the digital agenda.

Our newly renamed CatalystTM subscription research program (formerly known as Global Sourcing) provides GICs and enterprise clients with actionable insights to navigate through the evolutionary journey from captive to catalyst. Benefits of a Catalyst subscription include:

  • Industry-leading research and viewpoints on multiple topics relevant to GIC market
  • One-on-one briefings with Everest Group analysts and SMEs
  • Exclusive invitations to GIC events – including webinars, roundtables, and virtual networking sessions – organized by Everest Group

Learn more about our work in the GIC space, and see details about our Catalyst research program.