Author: Peter Bendor-Samuel

Balance Sheet Clean-Up Efforts Drive New Opportunities | Blog

Companies take different approaches for survival in what now looks to be a protracted and difficult recession caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and global economic crisis. Many want to clean up their balance sheets and focus on their core business. I note several trends in activities emerging from this effort, which also present new opportunities for other companies. Here are three current trends.

Read more in my blog on Forbes

Digital Transformation Benefits Beyond Cost Reduction | Blog

This is an intriguing time for digital transformation. For the past few years, many companies held back in the extent of digital transformation they were willing to undertake because the change management effort was huge. But the COVID-19 crisis and subsequent recession changed that picture and companies now look to accelerate digital transformation. Why? Because digitized processes deliver robust value-creation opportunities that go way beyond cost savings.

Read more in my blog on Forbes

Integrating Customer Support Call Centers With Artificial Intelligence | Blog

Companies currently invest a lot of money in target markets to generate potential customers’ interest in products and services. But after they achieve a sale, they often frustrate customers by not providing effective customer service support. A poor customer experience can erode the company’s brand and reputation and destroy the company’s opportunities to increase revenue through new purchases by those existing customers. Obviously, these are significant problems, especially in today’s highly competitive environment with customers’ quick pace in buying decisions. Let us now explore the solution.

Read more in my blog on Forbes

Indian IT consultancies struggle against technological obsolescence

The popularity of such in-house operations has to do with the changing economics of technology. This once required armies of people, so spreading costs among many clients made sense. With falling prices of hardware and software, and more skilled workers around, a captive centre can pay for itself with just 50 employees, says Peter Bendor-Samuel of the Everest Group, a research firm.

Firms in industries from energy to entertainment are discovering the value of developing their own technology. Their pace of spending with the consultants has slowed (see chart 2).

Read the full article on The Economist online here.

This article appeared in the Business section of the print edition under the headline “In need of a software update”

Call Centers Show Bright Spot In COVID-19 Crisis | Blog

We just came out of one of the best economies in history, but we now face a recession brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. Even if there were a V-shaped curve to the recovery, it would not change a looming huge factor going forward: cost reduction is more important than ever before. Although lower cost was not the significant driver in creating value in the digital world, COVID-19 adds a new wrinkle to transformation because it exposed the underlying support for business processes. It set the stage for what is now an overwhelming impetus for companies to take on the risks of changing the way they do business. Read more in my blog on Forbes

Data Management: An Unwitting Game of Russian Roulette | Blog

I noted in several recent blogs that the COVID-19 crisis increased the need for digital transformation because the crisis brings new value-creation opportunities to businesses, and I explained how to capture those business advantages even in a recession. It necessitates implementing the right infrastructure – not just cloud and automation, but also a robust data management capability. Unfortunately, many companies accelerate digital transformation without a robust data management structure. Warning: Lacking this ability for data mastery, they essentially play Russian roulette with their business going forward. Read my blog on Forbes

Is Work-From-Home Productivity A Mirage? | Blog

During the COVID-19 crisis, companies moved nearly all their white-collar workers around the world to work from home. It was an eye-opening experience. Almost universally, executives were surprised that working from home is far more effective than they anticipated. In fact, in many instances, it appears that people are more productive working from home than they were when working in their offices. But some of this supposed improvement in productivity is a mirage. Read more in my blog on Forbes

Develop Metrics That Drive Increased Productivity | Blog

There is a huge problem with trying to increase productivity in functions, processes and in business teams. Measurements of productivity look at the efficiency of a task. The assumption: if companies focus on making activities more efficient, they will increase productivity. History has not been kind to that belief. So, what enables the ability for teams to break out of their current way of doing business and reassemble the constituent pieces for more effective, more productive results?

SLAs Constrain Improving Productivity | Blog

Three years ago, I wrote some blogs stating that Service Level Agreements (SLAs) are dead. Unfortunately for businesses, SLAs are still around – they’re like zombies. Companies realized for many years that SLAs don’t work. They are not just ineffective; they constrain companies from getting to their goals for services. But, like zombies, they did not die. Why? Because there was nothing better to use in governing service agreements. Until now. In this blog, I will explain what works better than SLAs, and why. In digital service models, companies need to move to a new set of metrics. Metrics that focus on productivity. Metrics that focus on velocity. Fluid metrics that allow companies to adjust the target to a changing reality. Metrics that accurately affect pricing. Metrics that do not lock companies into old contractual vehicles that no longer work. Read more in my blog on Forbes

Manage Productivity With Employees Working From Home | Blog

As economies open up after the initial COVID-19 crisis that forced people to work from home, we see companies exploring the prospect of integrating the work-from-home model as a part of their operations at least for an extended future and probably permanently. But there is a fundamental question that they must resolve about this model: How can we ensure employees will operate at a high productivity level going forward? Read more in my blog on Forbes

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